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Sarah Unruh ’12

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Lecture will explore impact of global climate change on Kansas

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NORTH NEWTON, KAN. – The second program connected with Kauffman Museum’s current special exhibit will feature a faculty member from Kansas State University.

John Harrington, K-State professor of geography, will speak on “Global Climate Change: What it Might Mean for Kansas” Nov. 9 at 3:30 p.m. as part of the museum’s periodic Sunday-Afternoon-at-the-Museum series.

The lecture will be in the auditorium of Kauffman Museum, which is on the Bethel College campus, and is free and open to the public.

Harrington is a synoptic climatologist – he examines the factors behind extreme weather events and explores their impact on humans.

During the late 1980s, Harrington worked with the livestock ministry in the west African country of Niger to set up a system for mapping annual grasslands production in response to drought. More recently, he studied the causes of increased tornado activity in Kansas in 2011.

Harrington’s lecture is part of the programming associated with the current special exhibition at Kauffman Museum, “Climate and Energy Central: Doing Science in Kansas,” which explores the impact of global climate change and highlights research on renewable energy sources being conducted in the state of Kansas.

“Climate and Energy Central” remains at the museum through Jan. 18, 2015.

Regular Kauffman Museum hours are 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, and 1:30-4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The museum is closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission to “Climate and Energy Central: Doing Science in Kansas” as well as the permanent exhibits “Of Land and People,” “Mirror of the Martyrs” and “Mennonite Immigrant Furniture” is $4 for adults, $2 for children ages 6-16, and free to Kauffman Museum members and children under 6. For more information, call the museum at 316-283-1612 or visit its website,, or Facebook page.

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