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Final senior seminar presentation scheduled this week

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NORTH NEWTON, KAN. – The public is invited to a senior seminar presentation by English major Nathan R. Bartel.

Bartel, of Topeka, will read an original fiction piece, “The Art of Lies,” supported by an essay validating fantasy as a legitimate and needed literary genre, drawing on the writing of J.R.R. Tolkien and Ursula K. Le Guin. The presentation is at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 20, in Room 212 of the Administration Building.

Bartel’s major professors are Ami Regier, professor of English, and Nathan Bartel, assistant professor of English.

Two senior history students presented the results of their seminar research Thursday, April 10. Miriam Friesen, Filley, Neb., presented “Becoming better men: A comparison of self-improvement and masculinity in two Kansas Civilian Conservation Corps camps” and Jordan Penner, Reedley, Calif., shared his work on the emergence and growth of the Hispanic Mennonite churches and their influence within the larger Mennonite Church USA in “Gaining a voice: Hispanic Mennonites in America.”

Penner recently won the Kansas Association of Historians annual student paper competition with a study of construction of race in the use of Aztlan imagery in Chicano/a poetry and visual art in the 1970s and ’80s. Both students are double majors, Friesen in German and Penner in Spanish, and were recipients of 2007 Bethel College Research and Creative Activity grants.

The students’ major professors are Mark Jantzen, associate professor of history (currently on sabbatical), and Penelope Adams Moon, associate professor of history.

Saturday, April 12, Caley Ortman (double major in English and Bible and religion), Marion, S.D., presented his research on the history and transformation of hell. Darnell Neff, junior from North Newton, served as initial respondent to the presentation.

Ortman’s major professors are Ami Regier, professor of English, Nathan Bartel, assistant professor of English, Patricia Shelly, professor of Bible and religion (currently on sabbatical), and Brett Dewey, assistant professor of Bible and religion. Ortman was the recipient of a 2007 Research and Creative Activity grant.

Two senior English majors presented the results of their seminar research Tuesday, April 15. Kate Duncan, Kansas City, Kan., looked at genre, gender and plotting in slasher films through the lens of feminist literary theories. Her primary texts were Halloween and Scream, with secondary texts drawn from a large body of scholarly research. Amanda Diaz, junior from Berwyn, Ill., was the initial respondent to her presentation.

Cari Holliday, Andover, presented her work on magical humanism in two Latin American novels in the paper “‘Beyond his power’: The empowerment of the marginalized in The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende and Leaving Tabasco by Carmen Boullosa.” Maya Kehr, sophomore from Goshen, Ind., served as initial respondent to her presentation.

The major professors are Ami Regier, professor of English, and Nathan Bartel, assistant professor of English. Holliday, a double major in English and Spanish, received a 2007 Research and Creative Activity grant.

There were a number of senior seminar presentations given Thursday, April 17.

Psychology major Rondell Burge, Moundridge, presented “Music-elicited EEG activity, autonomic physiology and emotion responses are altered in schizophrenia” and psychology major Laurie Steffen, Cunningham, presented “Efficacy of imagined dialogue model of written emotional expression as a means for coping with acculturative stress.”

Burge was recently selected to receive a 2007-08 UPS Scholarship. He presented a poster on his thesis research at a national student research conference in Orlando, Fla., last November. Steffen, a double major in Spanish and psychology, was the recipient of a 2007 Research and Creative Activity grant.

Dwight Krehbiel, professor of psychology, and Paul Lewis, professor of psychology, are the major professors.

Social work major Tarson Powers, West Covina, Calif., presented “Turnover in social work employment,” social work major Melinda Stucky, Goessel, presented “Green House Project at Asbury Park: Perceptions of living and working environments” and social work major Chelsea Chaffin, Eudora, presented “A study of family history and attitudes as predictors of intimate partner abuse.”

The students’ major professors are Larry Friesen, professor of social work, and Ada Schmidt-Tieszen, professor of social work.

History major Peter Miller, Partridge, examined the dynamics surrounding a church split involving the Amish and Beachy Amish in Partridge, Kan., and history major Charles Schrag, Freeman, S.D., focused on the ways that Mennonite churches, particularly those in Freeman, S.D., related to draft-age men contemplating military service or conscientious objection in World War II.

Miller was a 2007 Research and Creative Activity grant recipient. Both students are double majors in history and Bible and religion. Their major professors are Mark Jantzen, associate professor of history (currently on sabbatical), Penelope Adams Moon, associate professor of history, Patricia Shelly, professor of Bible and religion (currently on sabbatical) and Brett Dewey, assistant professor of Bible and religion.

A number of seminar presentations were given Thursday, April 24, in psychology, social work, history, communication arts and English.

Psychology major Kiley Schmidt, Newton, presented “Mind matters: Self-theories of intelligence and socio-economic status” and psychology major Avery Smith, Newton, presented “Is the I ASSIST an effective management tool?” The students’ major advisors are Dwight Krehbiel, professor of psychology, and Paul Lewis, professor of psychology.

Social work major Samantha Naylor, Florence, presented “Presbyterian Manor health care study: The impact of nursing home placement” and social work major Kristin Wedel, Hutchinson, presented “A study of barriers to care for persons living with HIV/AIDS and how case management should help.” The major professors are Larry Friesen, professor of social work, and Ada Schmidt-Tieszen, professor of social work.

Aaron Voth, Hesston, examined the intersection of gentrification policies and the hardcore punk movement in New York City in the 1980s and Julia Fromm (double major with English), Newton, discussed how gender shaped the ways victims experienced and endured persecution in Nazi Germany. The major professors are Mark Jantzen, associate professor of history (currently on sabbatical), and Penelope Adams Moon, associate professor of history.

Voth, a double major in history and communication arts, earlier in the day gave the presentation “Tompkins Square Park: Where gentrification, politics and hardcore punk meet” to fulfill his communication arts requirements. His major professors are John McCabe-Juhnke, professor of communication arts, and Christine Crouse-Dick, assistant professor of communication arts.

English major Joseph Schrag, Wichita, examined the Harry Potter novels by J.K. Rowling in terms of the applicability of Joseph Campbell’s structure of myth and journey of the hero. Michael Voth, junior from Topeka, was the initial respondent. Schrag’s major professors are Ami Regier, professor of English, and Nathan Bartel, assistant professor of English.

Two communication arts majors presented their seminars Tuesday, April 29.

Tara Goerzen, Goessel, presented “NASA’s crisis communication plan following the explosion of the Columbia” and Braden Dragomir, Salt Spring Island, B.C., presented “Gamekillers: A semiotic view of humor and satire in the Axe ad campaign.” The students’ major professors are John McCabe-Juhnke, professor of communication arts, and Christine Crouse-Dick, assistant professor of communication arts.

Thursday, May 1, Mark Abrahams, Goessel, presented “ERP, attention and visual perception: Identifying preventable misses in optometric eye examinations,” and Kacy Canady, El Dorado, presented “Implicit bias in Bethel College students: A behavioral and event-related brain potential approach.”

Abrahams is a natural sciences major and Canady is a psychology major. Their major professors are Dwight Krehbiel, professor of psychology, and Paul Lewis, professor of psychology.

Also on May 1, Caitlin Buerge, Kansas City, Mo., presented “Healing words: The power of catharsis through Stuyvesant High School’s with their eyes.” She is a theater major and her major advisor is John McCabe-Juhnke, professor of communication arts.

Social work major Je T’aime Taylor, Kansas City, presented “A leap of faith: Faith-based community organizing in the 21st century” Thursday, May 8. Her major professors are Larry Friesen, professor of social work, and Ada Schmidt-Tieszen, professor of social work.

Monday, May 12, mathematical sciences majors Miriam Regier, Newton (a double major in German), and Bryce Schmidt, Freeman, S.D., presented their senior seminars, “Generation of language by semi-thue systems” and “Comparative analysis of single lane cellular automata traffic models,” respectively.

The students’ major professors are Christopher Earles, assistant professor of mathematics, and Richard Rempel, professor of mathematics.

Tuesday, May 13, Laurie Steffen, Cunningham, presented “Identidad lingüística y coexistencia pacífica: la situación bilingüe en Cataluña y sus implicaciones para los Estados Unidos” (“Linguistic identity and peaceful coexistence: The bilingual situation in Catalonia and its implications for the United States”). She is a double major in Spanish and psychology. Her major advisor is Martha Peterka, professor of Spanish.

Also on May 13, English major John Wiens, Goessel, presented his seminar research on family, literary lineages and where Harold Bloom went wrong, and read some of his own poetry. Julia Fromm (a double major in English and history), Newton, spoke on gender representation in films addressing the Holocaust.

The students’ major professors are Ami Regier, professor of English, and Nathan Bartel, assistant professor of English.

Tim Parker, Moundridge, presented “Art, creativity and mindfulness” May 14. Parker is a double major in art and Bible and religion. His major professors are Patricia Shelly, professor of Bible and religion (currently on sabbatical), Brett Dewey, assistant professor of Bible and religion, Gail Lutsch, professor of art, and David Long, associate professor of art.

There were a number of seminar presentations given Thursday, May 15, in communication, computer science and mathematics

Andrea Nickel, Windsor, Colo., presented “Drawing virtual worlds: An overview of computer graphics programming” and Jordan Regehr, Halstead, presented “The van Hiele model of thinking in geometry: What should teachers know?”. Nickel is a computer science major and Regehr is a math major.

The students’ major professors are Richard Rempel, professor of mathematics, Christopher Earles, assistant professor of mathematics, and Karl Friesen, assistant professor of computer science.

Shawn Rath, Moundridge, presented “A lack of peace: A rhetorical criticism of Sabeel (a leader in the search for peace in Israel/Palestine).” He is a double major in communication studies and Bible and religion. His major professors in the latter are Patricia Shelly, professor of Bible and religion (currently on sabbatical) and Brett Dewey, assistant professor of Bible and religion.

Communication arts major Cory Buchta, Newton, presented “His, hers and ours: Rhetoric, gender and political debates,” and communication arts major Shannon Carey, Moundridge, presented “Supernatural: The creation and perpetuation of myth in our society.”

The three students’ major advisors in communication are John McCabe-Juhnke, professor of communication arts, and Christine Crouse-Dick, assistant professor of communication arts.

Bethel College is a four-year liberal arts college affiliated with Mennonite Church USA. Founded in 1887, it is the oldest Mennonite college in North America. Bethel is known for its academic excellence and was the highest ranked Kansas college in the national liberal arts category of U.S. News & World Report’s listing of “America’s Best Colleges” for 2008. For more information, see the Bethel Web site at www.bethelks.edu.

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