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Academics

Self, Narrative and Schizophrenia

Faculty Supervisor:
Paul Lewis
Year of Project Completion:
2007
Student:
Tabitha John

Abstract

Self narrative is a promising and interesting aspect of schizophrenia that, for the most part, has been discussed in theoretical terms or has been investigated through case studies. In this study an open ended protocol is being utilized to investigate the differences between the narratives of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, a patient sample and a normal control sample. The Eight Key Events and the TST are the two main instruments being applied. Results did not show expected differences in content, variation, future script or perceived capabilities. Results did show that the schizophrenia group gave significantly better narratives for some of the Narrative Coherence Rating Scales: past temporal conceptual connections, past details and total past scores. TST results showed that there were no differences in the way in which diagnostic and non-diagnostic groups described themselves, but there was a significant difference in the quantity of responses given. It is suggested that future research should include a higher number of participants, a wider range of age groups, and a normal control sample for the Key Events.

About Bethel

As the first Mennonite college founded in North America, Bethel College celebrates a tradition of progressive Christian liberal arts education, diversity within community, and lifelong learning.