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A Thresher is a student, a musician, an athlete, an artist, a nurse, a faculty member, an employee of the school, an administrator, a part of this community, a friendly face, a piece of the puzzle.
Lizzie Shelly '13

Audition Tips

DO DON’T
  • Choose two monologues that are about two minutes each in length and come from a play.
  • Prepare your audition material in advance. Memorized and performance-ready is best.
  • Wear something classy and comfortable; like the way you look in it.
  • Smile, state your name and give the title of the play/s that your monologues are from. This is the perfect opportunity to check the acoustics.
  • Have fun! This is supposed to be something you enjoy.
  • Say thank you when your audition is over. Then go and celebrate with your family and friends on the great job you did.
  • Choose monologues from a movie or TV show and imitate the actor who performs them.
  • Choose something the night before or ask for a script to read from. We don’t have one.
  • Wear sloppy jeans and a trashy T-shirt. This gives the impression that you don’t care, which raises the question: Why should we?
  • Launch into your pieces before your faculty adjudicators are ready. Also, don’t forget to practice the titles and playwright’s names. You don’t want to stumble over your words before you begin.
  • Give up on yourself before you begin. The faculty at Bethel College want you to be successful and to do your best.
  • Walk out of the audition loudly commenting on what you did wrong. And don’t play it over and over again in your head. You’ll drive yourself crazy! Celebrate the high points and acknowledge the weak spots and know that regardless, you made the right choice to audition for Bethel.

Additional tips

Bring a theater resume that highlights your experience, including what shows you’ve been in and what roles you’ve had. This isn’t required, but is recommended. A student who walks in with a theater resume (different than a typical job resume) automatically shows s/he is serious about theater and has done her/his homework. A theater headshot is also highly recommended, even if it isn’t a professional job. A simple point and shoot camera is capable of taking some really great photographs. Have a friend take your picture and print a larger version at a local photo department.

If you plan on singing for one of your monologues, choose something that is in contrast to the character of your monologue. Have your music in a three-ring binder with pages front to back so that your accompanist can turn pages easily. Make sure your music is clearly marked with any tempo changes or pauses and be sure to give your accompanist a tempo to start with. But be careful! Nerves may cause you to give a faster tempo than normal, so make sure that you communicate an accurate song tempo.